Category Archives: in the gallery.

bold, with modernist undertones.

I discovered Louis Reith through Instagram, his images all bold graphics and modernist undertones. Dutch born, Reith has a background in graphic design which is clearly evident in his work, along with his fascination with book design and printed matter.

Crossing media from ink drawing to collage to three-dimensional installations, all works are nevertheless strongly connected, with monochromatic palettes and bold forms. I love the modernist quality, the images and typography from an earlier era abstracted in a new, contemporary way. I can imagine them in a very modern context – big spaces and white walls, or set against a more traditional interior of wood panelling and intimate spaces.

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Untitled, collage of found book pages, 20-5x28cm

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Untitled 2015 soil on wooden panel, 122x183cm

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Untitled 2015 soil on wooden panel, 66x122cm

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Installation view, Archiv, at Nina Sagt Gallerie, Dusseldorf
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Installation view, Soil on wood, 2014, 128x189cm

More Louis Reith, here.

Feature image: Untitled, collage of found book pages, 20-5x28cm.

All images courtesy of the artist.

lightscape.

A review of James Turrell at Houghton Hall

The role of an artist is to show us the world in a new light. To open our eyes to what we already see.

Turrell is a connoisseur of light and as a pilot is intimate with the sky in all its variance. Here in Norfolk he reveals the subtlety and variety of our maritime sky, the moisture in the air softening the light in a way that would never be seen in Arizona.

Turrell believes our eyes are most suited to seeing at dusk when there is very little light. St Elmo’s Breath is his most ephemeral piece at Houghton and reveals to us that we can see much more than we ever thought possible. The effect is so subtle that at first it is hard to believe you are really seeing anything, but gradually the photons start to accumulate and a silken carpet of red light reveals the space to us.

The poetic rationalism of his work has a strong resonance with the Palladian architecture of Houghton. Models of his work inside a crater in Pasadena reveal platonic volumes hollowed out from the earth which frame the nebulous phenomena of the sky so we might see them afresh.

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James Turrell at Houghton Hall until 24th October 2015.

Guest review by Jeremy Walker, HeathWalker Studio, with thanks. Photographs, owl’s house london.

happy weekend.

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A stunning display by Japanese flower artist, Azuma Maoto. More, here.

There’s a fascinating read in the NY Times Style magazine on another flower artist, Satoshi Kawamoto, the artist and creative director behind installations for brands like Filson, Gant and Mr Porter. Read it here. (Via)

Happy weekend.

happy weekend.

Fred Ingrams2

Flowering Potatoes, Dairy Drove, Ten Mile Bank, Aug 2014
Acrylic on panel
116 x 123cms

Vanishing Lines is a current exhibition by the Norfolk-based artist (and friend) Fred Ingrams.

Painting en plein air, Fred captures the flat marshland typical of the region in vivid and dramatic colour.

Vanishing Lines, Art Bermondsey 183-185 Bermondsey Street, London SE1 3UW
until Sunday 17th May 2015.

More images from the opening night on owl’s house london Instagram, here

happy weekend.

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Koluma 01, architecture Peter Zumthor, 2007. Photograph, Hélène Binet, ammann // gallery

Tightly cropped and thick with atmosphere, Hélène Binet’s photographs capture the play of light on the structures of some of contemporary architecture’s leading figures, including Zaha Hadid, Daniel Libeskind and Peter Zumthor. Binet is this year’s recipient of the Julius Shulman Institute Excellence in Photography Award.

Hélène Binet: Fragments of Light, February 28 — March 29, 2015. Woodbury University Hollywood Gallery, 6518 Hollywood Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90028

happy weekend.

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Fabulous abstract, graphic, black and white forms by Emil Kozak, in a new exhibition within Box in Denmark.

LYNfabrikken, Vestergade 49, 8000 Aarhus C, Denmark, until February 15 2015. More, here.

an enigmatic modernist.

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A XI 2011

Crossing the boundary between photography, art and sculpture, German artist Christine Erhard’s work is familiar and ambiguous at the same time. The  architectural subject matter and modernist aesthetic seem familiar, until the unusual viewpoint and use of materials cause the imagery to appear distorted and other worldly.

Initially studying sculpture, Christine Erhard became increasingly interested in the images of the object, rather than the objects themselves, until photography and its ability to manipulate became her primary focus. She explores various movements within Modernism, with the avant-garde architecture of the Russian Constructivists a theme she returns to over and again.

Christine cites artists of the 1920s such as Laszlo Moholy-Nagy as her inspiration; artists who work in various disciplines – painting, poetry, graphic design, photography. Like Moholy-Nagy, there is a strong graphic quality to her work. For me, these works are both familiar and enigmatic, and very appealing.

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AXX 2011

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MI II 2012

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QVIII  2012

More of Christine Erhard’s work, here. All images courtesy of the artist.