Tag Archives: gallery space

antwerp house in blue/grey.

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veerle_wenes_en_amberes_202974908_1200x800 veerle_wenes_en_amberes_575021604_1200x800 veerle_wenes-ohlveerle_wenes2-ohlLike Ampersand house (I write about it here and here), this home in Antwerp doubles as a gallery space. The first thing that one notices is the wall colour: an intense, muted grey/green. The second thing is the cobblestone floor and exposed brick. Originally built as a workshop in the 19th century, it translates beautifully into the 21st, with contemporary materials – resin floors and polished concrete elements – adding to the simple fixturing that allow the gallery’s pieces to be shown to best effect.

Much of the furniture is by Muller Van Severen, who describe their pieces as ‘sitting somewhere between art and design’. I love their simple, industrial but elegant aesthetic.

Gallery house in Antwerp via AD. Photographs: Ricardo Labougle

gallery house in concrete and pink.

A triple-height gallery housing a collection of prized paintings is concealed behind the wooden shingle facade of this house in Stuttgart. Like any well-designed gallery, the design is all about the internal spaces and how they play to the artworks that will embellish their walls. It is an inward looking house, with no long views. Rather, light and interior space are the game-players, allowing the artwork – a collection of old masters paintings – to take centre-stage. 

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Gallery space and living spaces are separated. A massive concrete core, extending ever up through four floors, acts as the spine of the building, housing the stair, kitchen, bathrooms and services. Clerestory windows bring light down into the gallery, while dedicated spotlights recessed into the concrete core on opposing sides light the artworks. Skylights along the ridge of the roof allow daylight into the living zones. 

Walls are painted in a curious dark shade of pink, which works beautifully against the raw concrete. Joinery, doors and bookshelves slotted into recesses add texture and warmth.

Shingle house by (se)arch architekten, via  Photography: Zooey Braun

Another wonderful home and gallery space, here