house of concrete and corten.

Concrete is the predominant material used in this beautifully considered renovation in an otherwise archetypal Victorian terrace in West London.

Cast insitu and finely detailed, it is used for floors, walls and furniture elements. Forming a storage unit or bench, walls and plinths change level or quietly recede, accommodating the day-to-day activities of a family – eating, reading, playing – whilst blurring the traditional division of rooms. The boundary is further blurred between indoor and outdoor spaces with a large window seat projecting into the garden.

The facade is clad in Corten steel with its wonderful rusted, oxide patina. Inside, Grey Elm joinery,  pale walls and brass fixtures also soften the palette and add warmth to the cool, grey concrete.

mxl-ingersoll-web-12_ohl.mxl-ingersoll-web-18_ohl.mxl-ingersoll-web-7_ohl.mxl-ingersoll-web-29a-web.1428664808mxl-ingersoll-web-32_ohl.mxl-ingersoll-web-27_ohl.

Moving up through he building, the existing structure and materials are allowed to coexist with the new. A palette of Douglas Fir floor boards, light coloured walls and exposed brickwork are the basis for a loft extension. A built-in desk extends the width of the study and becomes an open shelf as it wraps around the corner.

To me, this is the perfect solution for contemporary family living. What you think?

More Ingersoll Road by Mclaren Excell, here.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s