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urban geometry.

These striking images are part of a series called Urban Geometry, an architectural study of several European cities (this one, Alicante) using the geometric forms of local buildings and urban landscapes to inform the work.

Spanish photographer Andrés Gallardo Albajar is self-taught. His images are undoubtedly architectural in form, perhaps influenced by his architect parents. Linear form, curves and angles are highlighted against a background of surreal and vibrant colour.

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Urban Geometry, Andrés Gallardo Albajar. More, Behance

happy weekend.

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Seldom Seen, 2002, James Turrell. Photograph: Peter Huggins

I can’t wait to visit the James Turrell exhibition in Norfolk next weekend. Jonathan Jones calls it ‘a psychedelic legal high in the English countryside’ (read his review, here)

Houghton hall, a beautiful Palladian house on the North Norfolk coast, already has an impressive art collection, with works by Richard Long, Jeppe Hein and Rachel Whiteread. There is a previously commissioned piece by Turrell, called Skyspace, from 2000 (image above). This current exhibition includes the illumination of the Hall’s facade into a light show, which begins at dusk on Friday and Saturday evenings.

LightScape, James Turrell at Houghton Hall, North Norfolk until 24th October 2015.

More James Turrell, here

today’s image.

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The mighty Royal Festival Hall, via owl’s house london instagram. Follow me, here.

drama and serenity in copenhagen.

Today, I’m drawn to these drop dead gorgeous images showcasing the work of Studio Oliver Gustav.

From a studio, showroom and boutique in central Copenhagen, a carefully curated edit of designers and artists from around the world – Faye Toogood, Michaël Verheyden and Poul Kjærholm amongst others – sit against a monochrome interior. Beautiful pieces and striking lighting create a dramatic, yet intensely serene interior that feels timeless and elegant. I love each piece of the collection, not to mention that knock-out shade of grey used on the walls and ceilings.

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Studio Oliver Gustav, here, via

happy weekend.

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Seeking verdant greens and shade on these hot London days. Happy weekend.

Photograph of Hopkins House, Hampstead on owl’s house london Instagram. If you are in the market for a modern glass house, there’s one for sale, here. Designed by Norman Foster, the project architect was Patty Hopkins, who then went on to design the above house with Michael Hopkins.

house of the year 2015.

Drawing on classical country houses and Palladio, with Mies van der Rohe restraint and order, and European style courtyards, this house sets a new English country house style, without turning to mid-century language to express itself. David Chipperfield’s Fayland house in Buckinghamshire is Architecture Review’s House of The Year. Better known for his commercial buildings, art galleries and retail stores, his architecture is all about restraint.

A loggia extends across the length of the building, enabling the main living spaces to face the expansive landscape. The floor plan is laid out enfilade, meaning all doors are laid out along a single axis, providing a vista through the entire suite of rooms. This is reminiscent of grand European houses, and a style we use a lot in retail store planning.

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The palette of materials is neutral and luxe – terrazzo floors, exposed concrete ceiling, white marble bathrooms and kitchen. The rooms are lined with the same brick inside and out. The bricks are white, laid with a lime mortar of a similar tone. The technique used – the mortar applied thickly then sponged off – leaves a residue creating a sfumato effect, giving a soft, homogenous look, far from the industrial look of a regular raw brick wall. The details are sublime with nothing extraneous – skirtings, architraves and cornices are not required where junctions between surfaces align with millimetre precision. Dark metal framed windows frame the view and save the palette from feeling anodyne.

What do you think of House of the Year?
Fayland House by David Chipperfield, via Architecture Review.

The RIBA have also announced their winners for 2015, here.